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Puppet Emperor Palace

An Enormous Monument of China’s Past

Puppet Emperor Palace or Imperial Palace of Manchu State is the former palace of Puyi (1906 – 1967), the final emperor of the Qing Dynasty. The palace, one of three great imperial palaces in China, still exists today.

Located on Guangfu Road, Changchun city, the Puppet Emperor’s Palace also survived the Japanese invasion. In 1932, “Manchukuo” was established under the support of the Japanese empire to pursue colonial domination of northwest China, and Puyi became the “puppet emperor,” but it was not recognized by the Chinese government.

Now it has become an important tourist attraction and a place where the Chinese can learn about recent history. As a 5A tourist spot, the palace covers 62 acres (25,0500 square meters), and over 30 sites have been opened to the public.

The palace is separated into two parts: the outer palace for political activities, and inner palace for daily life. The main buildings of outer palace includes Qinmin Lou, Huangyuan Lou and Jiale Hall. Qinmin was the place where Puyi dealt with government affairs, and the Inner palace is where Puyi and his relatives lived. Jixi Lou was the residence of Puyi and his wife, Wan Rong. Tongde Hall was the residence of Fu Gui Ren (Puyi’s concubine). Now the palace is the part of Jilin Museum.

All in all, the palace is a place where tourists can learn the history of the Manchu State and is well worth a visit.

Travel Tips:

Admission: 80 RMB
Opening Times: 08:30 – 17:20 (May 1 to October 7)
08:30 – 16:50 (October 8 to April 30)
How to Get to: Take bus 264 to get off at Weihuanggong stop or bus 125 to get off at Shanxilu and Guangfulu stop.

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